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Reviews

Making your ideas stick

by David Brewster Reviews

Like many of you, I have a lot of books on the shelves of my office, not to mention beside my bed. I’m a sucker for a snappy title which, combined with the instant gratification offered by online shopping, has made building a large collection all too easy in recent years. Of course, some of […]

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“Up in the Air” Cracks the Ice

by David Brewster Management
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“There’s a law of diminishing returns on preaching”. So said author Kate Grenville in a thought provoking lecture, ‘Writers in a Time of Change’, in 2009*. Yet everyday, in thousands of blog posts and columns all over the world, preaching is exactly what many very earnest writers do. I do it myself – often. There […]

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Inspiration from a Deaf, Nutty Genius

by David Brewster Management
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A deaf bloke with dubious personal hygiene. A complete nutter who died nearly 200 years ago. And a modern day inspiration for artists and business people alike. All in the same person. Who’d have thunk it? But Beethoven was, and is, all of those things. In Search of Beethoven is an engrossing new feature length […]

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Why Everyone – even Blokes – should see ‘The September Issue’

by David Brewster Innovation
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To judge from the gender balance in the audience, there aren’t a lot of blokes lining up to see The September Issue, the new documentary feature that gives us a peek inside the walls of Vogue magazine in New York. Which is a pity, because the film has a lot to offer anyone – male […]

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Our Life at Work Stripped Bare

by David Brewster Management

Most of us spend a healthy slice of our lives working. We spend additional time thinking about work, but these thoughts are generally focused on the job at hand. We think through an upcoming meeting, worry about a deadline or scheme about our next job change. Much less often do we think about the wider connection of our work to our community. Rarely, if ever, do we think about the extent to which others’ work impacts on, and is essential to, our way of life. In ‘The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work’, Alain de Botton does this for us in a thoughtful and entertaining way.

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